Simplifying PRE– and POST- Workout Nutrition for Weight Loss

August 20, 2014 By: office Comments Off

Written by Sonya Luisi, M.S. Dietetics and Nutrition

Pre & Post Workout Blog

What you eat before a workout is imperative for fueling your workout and maximizing your performance.

What you eat after a workout is crucial for optimizing the recovery process and gives your body the energy it needs to recover quickly and work more efficiently.

Ensuring that you have the proper PRE- and POST- workout nutrition will certainly play a positive role in your overall results.

What should you eat BEFORE a workout?

The last meal you eat before your workout is meant to give your body all the energy it needs to ensure optimum performance. Your pre- workout meal functions to:

  • Decrease muscle glycogen depletion
  • Decrease muscle protein breakdown
  • Decrease post workout cortisol levels

According to the Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutritionist group, your pre-workout meals should be a combination of low-fiber carbohydrates without added sugars and protein.  Aim to make your meal or snack with well-tolerated foods, which means avoiding fast foods, pasta buffets, high fiber products and spicy foods. Aim to eat these about 45 minutes to one hour before your workout though food intake timing may differ for each individual depending on your body’s ability to tolerate specific foods before activity.

Stay hydrated with water and avoid carbonated beverages before physical activity. Sports Dietitians suggest aiming for 16 ounces of water two hours before your workout.

For a quick carb fuel-up to your next workout, chose an apple and with all-natural peanut butter. For a PRE- workout meal option, mix salad greens with assorted veggies and a hardboiled egg, with a drizzle of olive oil and vinegar, or your favorite low-fat dressing.

What should you eat AFTER a workout?

Immediately after a workout the body needs to repair, replenish, recover and adapt.  Your post- workout meal is a first defense for maintaining and building lean body mass, which increases our metabolism and helps us burn more calories throughout the day. In addition, a post workout meal will:

  • Decrease muscle soreness and fatigue
  • Decrease muscle protein breakdown caused by exercise
  • Decrease cortisol levels
  • Replenish depleted glycogen levels from exercise
  • Increase overall muscle protein synthesis

A post- workout meal should be a combination of protein and carbohydrates. Aim to consume these within twenty minutes post- workout when our body is primed and ready to accept protein and carbohydrates so it can immediately begin processing the nutrients to accomplish all the above functions.

Put one medium banana, one cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk and ice in a blender for a quick post-workout snack. For a post workout meal, have “breakfast for dinner”: scramble one whole egg and two egg whites with a handful of chopped spinach, bell peppers and ½ sweet potato, diced and add one ounce of low-fat cheese or avocado.

How do you incorporate PRE and POST workout meals into a weight loss plan?

Menu planning will be the most important tool to incorporate into your daily activity to ensure your pre and post workout meals are not “extra” calories but are part of your total daily energy needs. For example, if your estimated energy needs are 1500 to 1700 calories per day, then the calories from the meals and snacks before and after your workout need to be part of those 1500 to 1700 calories – not in addition to them!

Sources:

http://scandpg.blogspot.de/2012/03/eating-for-exercise.html Accessed July 19, 2014.

http://www.acaloriecounter.com/diet/pre-and-post-workout-meal/ Accessed July 20, 2014.

http://www.muscleandfitness.com/nutrition/gain-mass/sponsored-post-pre-and-post-workout-nutrition-simplified Accessed July 20, 2014.

Print Friendly

Weight Loss Surgery: Giant Leap or Stepping Stone?

April 29, 2014 By: office Comments Off

So you’ve gotten a weight-loss surgery, what next? A lot of people who undergo lapband surgery, gastric bypass or liposuction seem to believe it’s a free pass to continue eating the way they were accustomed to. The SAME way that led them to the point where they needed weight loss surgical intervention in the first place!

Fat_removal_using_cannula_during_tumescent_liposuction

We at Shane Diet & Fitness Resorts know that weight loss is a matter of behavior modification. It starts with you! Changing your mind is the only real way to create lasting change within the body and when your insides are feeling strong, your outsides are sure to reflect that.

There simply is no substitute for adequate exercise and a balanced diet that suits your body’s own unique needs in a way that’s both satisfying and conducive to good health. By all means, utilize surgery as a first step, but take it for what it is…a stepping stone to a place you couldn’t get before and a start to the new lifestyles you need to cultivate a future brimming with the best you have to give.

Print Friendly

Obesity News: Food Addiction Similar to Drug Addiction

April 1, 2014 By: office Comments Off

Overeating SmallFood addiction is not only a serious problem, but can also be a major contributor to becoming overweight or obese.  According to a new study, food addiction tendencies create strong responses in the brain similar to those of drugs and alcohol, as reported in Discovery News by Marianne English.

In the past, researchers have used functional MRI machines to look at the relationship between obesity and substance addictions.  This is the first time that the link between food addiction tendencies and responses in the brain are being observed.

An experiment was set up with 48 young women enrolled in a weight management program.  These subjects ranged from lean to obese based on their body mass index (BMI).

After using the Yale Food Addiction Scale to assess subjects’ food addiction tendencies, researchers placed them into a MRI machine to measure blood flow in different areas of their brain.

Each subject was presented with one of two photos: one photo was of a chocolate milkshake, with the other being a glass of water.  Five minutes after exposure to these photos, subjects received small portions of a chocolate shake or a flavorless solution, depending on the image they had been presented with.  When subjects with higher food addiction tendencies viewed photos of a milkshake, they displayed brain responses similar to what’s seen in individuals with addictive behaviors toward drugs or alcohol.

It was also discovered that BMI did not necessarily predict levels of food addiction.  In addition, anticipation of food produces greater response in the brain when compared to actually consuming the food.  This may be an explanation as to why people with addictive eating behaviors overeat from not feeling satisfied.

There will need to be more research done on this subject to discover men’s food addiction behaviors, since this specific study only focused on women.  There will also need to be more research done on various age groups.

The CDC believes that these types of studies will also help us understand biology’s contributions to obesity, which affects nearly one third of adults in America.

What are your thoughts on food addiction?  Can you believe that the brain responses towards food can be as powerful as a reaction towards drugs and alcohol?

Print Friendly

Weight Loss Camp KIND Bar Kitchen Experiment

January 31, 2014 By: consultant Comments Off

We’re always looking for ways to eat better and save money.  At Shane Diet & Fitness Resorts, our weight loss camp for adults, did a fun little experiment for a quick snack bar that that tastes just like the real thing you’d find at the grocery store.  Take a look at the recipe we used for a homemade version of a “KIND” bar.

This recipe is great!  It really tastes just like a KIND Bar, and instead of paying $1.50 per bar, Monica Matheny, the author of the post, estimates the cost around $0.44 per bar, which is a huge savings!

This recipe makes 20 bars, so you can wrap them individually in parchment paper and pop them in the freezer for later use.   These make a tasty snack or quick breakfast on the go.  They are also a great source of heart-healthy fat found in nuts, they contain protein, fiber, and less sugar than many other bars out there. Can it get any better than that? Take some time to have a little fun in the kitchen – find recipes for some of your favorite healthy snacks, try them at home and tell us how they turned out!

Homemade KIND Bars

Our adult weight loss camp made their own version of KIND Bars. See before, during and after!

Print Friendly

Weight Loss Camps Discuss the Diet Report Card

September 27, 2013 By: office 10 Comments

SAMSUNGIn the last few years, we have all heard about Choose My Plate, Let’s Move and the Healthy Food Financing initiative, just a few of the things that we are promoting as a country to promote a healthy diet and to lower the number of overweight and obese Americans. But have any of these initiatives worked?

According to an article in the New York Times, Dietary Report Card Disappoints, we may not have had as much improvement as we have hoped for. A Washington-based advocacy group, the Center for Science in the Public Interest has updated our “report card” on diet.

They have collected data from 1970-2010 on the changing patterns of food consumption and the results, although not all bad, are not as good as expected. Although we still consume a significant amount of added sugars (sugar and high-fructose corn syrup), it has been reduced from what the group called the “sugar high” of 1999 of 89 pounds per person to 78 pounds per person in 2010.

Since 1970, Americans eats 20 pounds more fat yearly, which has more than doubled the number of obese adults. There are a number of reasons why this number is still so high, as a whole, we are eating more fat, and grain products, and cheeses high in dairy fat and not eating enough chicken or fish. Americans are also eating approximately 500 more calories a day than in 1970 because we no longer know what a normal portion size is.

We still have a long way to go to get where we need to be as a country in terms of eating healthy and losing weight and we all have a part to play. Today for lunch instead of ordering a sandwich and a soda order a salad and water and snack on cut up veggies instead of chips or candy.

We know that changing our behavior towards food can be difficult and at our weight loss camps we teach you how to eat right and get fit. If you need some help getting that jump start you need and to get some tips on how to get started, take a look at attending one of our camps.

Print Friendly

Weight Loss & Weight Gain: How Big of a Role do Genetics Play?

July 9, 2013 By: consultant 2 Comments

imagesHave you ever experienced successful weight loss just to eventually gain some, most, or all of it back? Even if this scenario has not happened to you personally, you probably know someone who has gone through it. It can be extremely frustrating to devote so much time and energy to shedding the pounds, just to have it creep back on. So is there a science to losing the weight and keeping it off? According to research highlighted in a New York Times article that just may be the case.

In this article, author Tara Parker-Pope is able to relate to anyone who has been motivated to lose weight, just to have it return later on. Even while maintaining a healthy lifestyle, she has been unable to keep the weight she’s lost off. She mentions that it could very well be due to genetics, because many of her immediate family members have also struggled with weight loss and keeping it off. But it is still up in the air as to how much of a role genetics play versus the environment.

So is weight gain (and weight loss) pre-determined by your body and brain’s genetic makeup? Or does it come down to the environment you are surrounded by? Recent research, as discussed in this article, says that it could go either way.

The National Weight Control Registry tracked 10,000 people who have lost weight and kept it off. Rena Wing, a professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University’s Alpert Medical School, helped create this registry with James O. Hill, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of Colorado in Denver.

Wing says physiological changes probably do occur that make permanent weight loss difficult, but she says the larger problem is environmental. She says people struggle to keep weight off because they are constantly surrounded by food, food messages, and opportunities to eat. “We’ve taught ourselves over the years that one of the ways to reward yourself is with food,” Wing says. “It’s hard to change the environment and the behavior.”

Although the people in the registry used different methods for weight loss, there does seem to be a common denominator. In order to have lost the weight and maintain the weight loss, a person must eat fewer calories and exercise far more than someone who maintains the same weight naturally.

Kelly Brownell, director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University, says that while the 10,000 people tracked in the registry are a useful resource, they also represent a tiny percentage of the tens of millions of people who have tried to lose weight and keep it off unsuccessfully. “You find these people are incredibly vigilant about maintaining their weight,” Brownell says. “Years later they are paying attention to every calorie, spending an hour a day on exercise. They never don’t think about their weight.”

From a different perspective, Rudolph Leibel, an obesity researcher at Columbia University, believes that weight loss and the ability to keep it off is based on a biological system. For 25 years, Liebel and his colleague Michael Rosenbaum, have meticulously tracked about 130 individuals for a minimum of six months. The participants would stay at the research clinic where every aspect of their body is measured, including body fat, oxygen consumption, carbon-dioxide output, calories burned during digestion, exercise tests to measure maximum heart rate, blood tests to measure hormones and brain chemicals, and muscle biopsies to measure metabolic efficiency.

The Columbia University participants are eventually placed on a liquid diet of approximately 800 calories a day until they have lost 10% of their body weight. Once they reach this goal, they are put through another round of intensive testing as they try to maintain the new weight. The data generated by this research suggests that once a person loses about 10% of their body weight, they are metabolically different than a similar-size person who is naturally the same weight.

The results also found that the changes that occur after weight loss translate to a huge caloric disadvantage. In other words, for someone to maintain their weight loss, they must eat fewer calories than someone who is naturally the same weight. The study also found that people who have lost weight burn fewer calories during physical activity than a person who is naturally the same weight.

The brain also seems to respond differently to food after losing weight, as per data collected from the Columbia University study. “After you’ve lost weight, your brain has a greater emotional response to food,” Rosenbaum says. “You want it more, but the areas of the brain involved in restraint are less active.” Combine that with a body that is now burning fewer calories than expected, he says, “and you’ve created the perfect storm for weight regain.”

It is clear that there will need to be more in-depth studying done of varying degrees to find out what influences weight loss and maintenance. Eventually, this research may change the way people approach weight loss.

Meanwhile, Shane Diet & Fitness Resorts sticks to the basics: fewer calories in and the right amount of physical activity to burn those calories. Since 1968, Shane’s participants have found success with gradual and steady weight loss, as opposed to trying to lose the weight as quickly as possible. Experience has shown that it takes time to form a habit and good healthy lifestyle habits can change a person’s life permanently.

Print Friendly

Motivation to Reach Your Goals Through 2013

January 7, 2013 By: consultant 9 Comments

For the first time in human history, overeating is now more of a global health threat than hunger.  According to medical journal, The Lancet, more than 3 million deaths in 2010 were attributable to excess body weight, three times the death toll due to malnutrition.

We live in a world of an over-abundant amount of cheap food.  Where gorging at the buffet is a practiced on a regular basis and heart disease and type 2 Diabetes is on the rise among young people. With all of the options out there, why do we make the choices that lead us to illness?  If we just knew how to change our bad habits and move toward healthy lifestyle changes. Shane Diet and Fitness Resorts can help you do just that!  We have lectures and workshops that help you understand how, why and what to do every day to keep you on track. Our counselors help you discover what obstacles are getting in the way of achieving your personal fitness and weight loss goals.

Millions of Americans will try to achieve their New Year’s resolution, pledging to lose weight, spend less money, quit smoking, exercise more…making overnight changes require enormous amounts of self-discipline and support, which can be hard to find. Studies have shown that willpower is a depletable resource. Setting challenging goals can quickly use up your stores of willpower and all your best intentions will fall by the wayside. Here are some tips to staying motivated to creating solid positive changes for 2013.

  • Make tiny goals that can sneak under the radar of you mind. Exercising for five minutes instead of an hour might seem worthless, but you are much less likely to resist it.  Studies show that five minutes here and there throughout the day still adds up. Five minutes today, will lead to 6 minutes tomorrow, to a half hour by the weekend. Motivation is fleeting and the largest barrier to reaching your goals. By taking small steps you will build up your willpower, create new habits and reach success.
  • Search for a deep reason – something compelling – that is the reason for making the changes in your life.  Is it because you want to look good in an outfit or is it a matter of life and death!  Make it long term, like dancing with your child at their wedding, or being able to really play with your grandchildren.
  • Test yourself every week.  Time yourself in a plank on your elbows, or hold a squat hovering above a chair. See if you can increase the time you can hold it every week. How about your balance? Stand on one foot. Too easy? Try to balance on the ball of your foot like a dancer.
  • Drop the “All or Nothing” mentality. You have to discover what is manageable for you. Be honest with yourself and figure out how you can fit movement into your life.  Perform Squats while washing the dishes, raise up on your toes while brushing your teeth, walk the stairs for five minutes during your lunch break, stand while talking on the phone. Don’t overthink it, just find something you can do on a regular basis and don’t get discouraged if you stop – start up again as soon as you can.

Need more help? The Shane Staff is here to provide you with a Success Map to help you reach your diet and fitness goals. We will help get you where you want to go and will give you the tools you need to continue to reach those goals once you leave.

 

Print Friendly

Rosie’s Top Tips for After Shane

November 13, 2012 By: office 3 Comments

This is really special guest post for us- Rosie was a guest at the Shane Diet & Fitness New York resort this summer, and has become one of our Success Stories.  She’s been working hard ever since she left to continue to achieve her weight loss goals while attending college and studying to become a fitness trainer- something she never thought possible before this summer.  Rosie shared with us her top ten habits, thoughts and reminders that have helped her continue her weight loss.

  1. Stick to the routine, even if it isn’t strictly the Shane routine, pick times of the day that work for you to eat and exercise and stick to them.
  2. Don’t get hungry, whatever you do avoid going long periods of time without food, it won’t help weight loss and you’ll end up eating something unhealthy.  Also don’t save up all your calories to eat badly, if you’re going to eat badly plan for it but don’t avoid food all day.
  3. Don’t feel guilty, if you want something so badly you can’t think straight… have it, have a small portion, don’t do it all the time, work out a bit more that week but don’t beat yourself up about it. Own your decisions.
  4. Don’t forget where you’re going, or where you came from. If it feels like progress is slow once you get home don’t forget all the progress you’ve already made and don’t let slow progress stop you feeling achievement or set you back. Even slow progress is a step in the right direction and if you can accept it’s not going to happen overnight you’ll do better in the long run.
  5. Fight cravings, recognize that cravings aren’t usually hunger and tackle them, if it’s an appropriate time to eat have a healthy alternative. If not occupy yourself, take up knitting or paint your nails, read a magazine or have a hot drink like green or herbal tea. Do whatever works for you as a distraction.
  6. Reward yourself, every time you have a healthy home cooked meal rather than a take out or don’t buy that chocolate bar on the way home or take a pack lunch to work. Use the money you save to buy yourself a new outfit or a recipe book.
  7. Be goal oriented, without something to aim for its hard to stay on track, whether it’s a weight to lose, a weight to lift or a race to finish achieving goals is a great way to mark progress. And if it doesn’t happen first time round don’t despair, reassess and try again.
  8. Don’t weigh yourself every day, by all means once a week, even make a chart but don’t do it every day you’ll get sucked up in the little numbers and it won’t feel like you’re making progress when you are.
  9. Keep in touch, Shane creates an environment where you live, eat, sleep and work out with the same people, you go through a lot with them, they are your friends, your family and your support network while you’re there. Don’t lose that when you get home, the staff and the programme will be there for you long after you leave but so will everyone else and it’s a great opportunity to make life long friends. Make sure you utilize that.
  10. And most of all, do not, under any circumstances, give up. You might stop losing weight, you might even gain a few pounds, maybe you’re injured, something is going on at home or at school or you just don’t feel like its worth it. But this is your life, you only get one and it’s never too late to make the most of it. Take the opportunity to get healthy, get fit and enjoy your body.

 

Print Friendly

Obesity Trends: The Numbers Behind an Urgent Fight

November 29, 2011 By: office 1 Comment

We all know now that obesity in the United States is considered to be an epidemic, and is also on the rise. A recent article in the New York Times outlines some of the more shocking statistics our country faces if these trends continue as they have been since the 1970s.

By 2020, three of every four Americans will be overweight or obese if the trends continue. By 2030, there could be 65 million more obese adults in the United States than in 2010, according to the epidemiologist Dr. Y. Claire Wang and her colleagues at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

If these predictions actually come true, it would mean 8 million more cases of diabetics, 6.8 million more cases of atherosclerotic heart disease and stroke and more than 500,000 more cases of cancer. Obviously, this would also impact health costs in our country.

Camp Shane weight loss camps for children and Shane Diet & Fitness Resorts weight loss program for adults are doing their part to fight obesity by helping people learn a healthy lifestyle and maintain it through nutritious eating and physical activity. For more information about transforming your life, visit www.campshane.com and www.shanedietresorts.com.

Print Friendly

Obesity and Overeating: Breaking a Bad Habit

November 9, 2011 By: office 2 Comments

Do you ever find yourself eating when you’re not even hungry? Do you need to have a snack at the movies or while watching television? If you said yes to both of these questions, you may be in the habit of overeating. It’s a bad habit, but the good news is, any bad habit can be broken! This was the topic of discussion in a recent article from ABC News.

Obesity and Bad Habits

Research finds that some people have gotten into a habit of eating when engaging in certain activities, such as popcorn at the movies.

Psychologists David Neal and Wendy Wood from the University of Southern California have come up with a simple formula that may help break the habit of overeating, which may lead to weight loss for many people who struggle with this habit. They say that rather than trying to overwhelm the habit with a strong sense of self control, alter the environment that triggers the automatic response, or habit. This conclusion comes from the findings of a very interesting study involving a movie theater and a bag of stale popcorn.

Neal and Wood, along with several colleagues, wanted to find out if people who nearly always eat a bag of popcorn when at the movies would eat it, even if it was old and stale, simply because it has become a habit.

Several hundred participants were recruited, some who really wanted popcorn with a movie, some who sometimes wanted popcorn, and some who really didn’t care either way. Each person attending a showing in a regular theater was quizzed on how much they liked popcorn, how hungry they were, and several other things. They were not allowed to sit near anyone else.

Half of the participants were given a bag of freshly cooked popcorn, and the other half were given a bag that had been sitting around for several days, leaving it stale. After the showing the bags were collected and weighed. Participants who could take it or leave it left the stale popcorn almost untouched. But habitual popcorn eaters ate the whole thing, regardless of whether their bag was new or stale. This goes to show that it isn’t so much about the taste or hunger level for these participants, but rather about the habit.

In the second experiment, new participants sat in a meeting room, as opposed to a movie theater. Again, half the participants were given a fresh bag of popcorn, while the other half received a stale bag. This time, even the habitual popcorn hounds ignored the stale popcorn and the only change was the setting. This goes to show that a small alteration can greatly impact the habit.

In a third experiment with new participants, the setting was back to the movie theater. Again, half the participants received fresh popcorn, while the other half received stale popcorn. This time, however, the participants were instructed to eat only with their “non-dominant” hand. None of the participants cared much for the stale popcorn, even in the movie theater setting. This goes to show that even a small cue can overwhelm a habit because it causes the person to have to think about what they were doing, rather than just going through the motions.

“On average, people have more good habits than bad,” said Neal. But bad habits can be particularly destructive, contributing to the current obesity crisis, he added.

Neal has some simple tips to help you in your weight loss efforts on the path to a healthy lifestyle. Put the cookie jar where you can’t see it. Look only at the salad menu in your favorite restaurant. “Basically, it’s not really a matter of setting the right goals or having enough will power,” he said. “Those things are valuable, but they don’t really get you over the line. The critical thing to focus on is the environment.”

This news should be encouraging to most, because bad habits can be broken. Camp Shane weight loss camps for children and Shane Diet Resorts weight loss program for adults know the importance of getting into good lifestyle habits, while leaving the bad ones behind. If you eat healthy every single day, it will become a habit. If you exercise daily or a few times per week, it will become a habit. If you currently experience bad habits, it is time to make small adjustments in your life!

Do you have any bad habits that you need to break? Or, have you already broken a bad habit? We would love to hear from you.

Print Friendly

Price Match Guarantee

Check out details for Shane's Price Match Guarantee for our New York & Texas Resorts.

Weight Loss Camp For Kids

Weight Loss Camp For Kids

Texas Google Plus

Texas Google Plus

New York Google Plus

New York Google Plus

Award Winning…

Award Winning…

Testimonials

I loved the variety of classes offered...

I loved the variety of classes offered as well...

Jacqueline (New York) 24

See Young Adult Testimonials

I was so impressed with the staff's knowledge and ability...

Your staff is top notch. So...

Kim (Maryland) 42

See Adult Testimonials

Staff in Action

Staff in Action