What Exercise Fits You Best?

April 22, 2014 By: office Comments Off

By: Debbie Davis

“What exercise fits you best?” is a pretty straight forward question with an even more straight forward answer. It’s simply the kind of exercises that you like and are more likely to do! The bigger issue here is that our preferred exercise is usually not enough. Our guests at Shane Diet and Fitness Resorts tell us all the time, “I love Zumba but I hate cardio, weights etc.” Rarely do they incorporate strength training, stretching and cardio into what would be a more balanced, effective workout regime.

Personal_trainer_showing_a_client_how_to_exercise_the_right_way_and_educating_them_along_the_way

The exercise that fits you best is clearly the exercise you will do. If you enjoy it, you’re more inclined to do it with more consistency. But the key point to remember is to make sure you are including a balance of all exercises. You may never love stretching but it is imperative for overall performance that you stretch your muscles. You may never run a 10K, but cardio training is critical for your overall heart and lung health. Many won’t be entering Strong Man competitions, but strength training is critical for bone and muscle preservation, which additionally benefits your quality of life as you age.

So, by all means begin with the exercise you most enjoy doing, take that exercise and excel, practice, train and challenge yourself. Then take the forms of the exercise that are not your favorite and implement them into your routine in an effective way. If cardio is your thing and you perform cardio 5 days a week, consider taking that to 4 days a week and adding 2 days of strength training (one of which can be included on a cardio day). Another idea is possibly taking two days a week to perform a High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) workout which has a cardio component as well as a strength training component. Stretching for better range of motion and flexibility should be included in your daily workout routine. As a personal trainer for over 15 years, I understand loving some forms of exercise and hating others. I would like to challenge you, though, to continue to excel at what you enjoy but to also consider taking your challenge one step further and adding what you’re not so comfortable with for better overall physical health. Your body will thank you!

Below is a link to a fun quiz that reveals your exercise personality type, it takes 1 minute. See how accurate it is for yourself and then post it on our Facebook page. Happy Fitness!

http://exercise.about.com/library/blfitnesspersonalityquiz.htm

Weight Loss Programs Produce Bigger Results than Standard Care

September 9, 2011 By: office 7 Comments

Have you participated in a weight loss program, such as Shane Diet Resorts weight loss camp for adults or Weight Watchers? If you have, you most likely saw successful results. A new study finds that dieters may be more likely to slim down if they are referred to a commercial weight loss program than if they use a primary health care provider alone, as described in a recent Health Day article.

Weight Loss Programs Produce Big Results

Research finds that weight loss programs produce bigger weight loss results than standard care alone.

Overweight adults in Germany, Australia, and the United Kingdom who were referred to Weight Watchers by a primary health care provider lost about twice as much weight over a year as dieters assigned to standard weight-loss care, according to the study funded by Weight Watchers.

In this study, 772 overweight and obese adults were randomly assigned to a year of diet care overseen by a primary care professional or to 12 months’ free membership to a local Weight Watchers group. Of the dieters involved in the study, 54 percent of the standard-care dieters completed the 12-months, compared to 61 percent of the Weight Watchers group.

Those who stuck with their standard diet lost an average of about 7 pounds, while those who attended Weight Watchers shed nearly 15 pounds on average. The Weight Watchers participants were also more than three times as likely to have dropped 5 percent or more of their body weight compared to the standard dieters.

This research suggests that the structure of the commercial program, including group support, weekly weighing, instruction about diet and physical activity, and motivation, can be a clinically useful tool for battling overweight and obesity on a large scale. Further research is needed to see if the gains can be maintained over time.

The researchers also said the findings suggested that overweight people were more likely to lose weight if they were referred to a commercial weight-loss program by a physician or another primary care provider, rather than if they enrolled on their own.

If you’re looking to lose weight and keep it off, consider a weight loss program for adults such as Shane Diet Resorts. Weight loss programs are excellent because they instill good lifestyle habits in the participants through the simple formula of healthy eating in combination with regular exercise. Have you had success with a weight loss program? We would love to hear about your experience!

Stop Looking at the Scale, Part 2: Other ways to Tell if you are Progressing

August 13, 2011 By: afeldman 3 Comments

In my last article, I explained why looking at the scale constantly is not a true indicator of weight room and weight loss progress and also, how to properly weigh yourself. In this article I will go further and explain some other ways in which you can measure progress in exercise. The good thing about these is that if one measurement seems to plateau, there are several others which may be improving. This means that just because one part of your  fitness program isn’t excelling as quickly, does not mean that the whole machine is broke. Listed below are a variety of things to measure when looking at fitness progress as a whole.

How much weight you are using

It is very important to keep records of the weights you use during exercise. Not only will writing help you remember what weight to use, it will also push you to increase those weights. To measure progress with a weight room journal,  record weight room numbers (weight used, repetitions done and sets of each exercise) and once some time has passed, look back to past workouts and compare the numbers on various exercises from past to present. You will immediately be able to tell if you have gotten stronger and on which exercises.

How quickly you are moving

Running

Test yourself to see how quickly you can move during cardio exercise.

This refers to how quickly you move while doing cardio vascular exercises. This can be assessed by looking at distances covered on each piece of equipment you use or from how far you go outside. To measure progress, give yourself a 1 Mile test every 2 weeks. In a 1 mile test, you walk/run a mile as quickly as possible taking minimal breaks. The idea is to compare how long your mile takes with how long it took before. This mile test should be done at the beginning of a workout when you are fresh. It can be done on a track, treadmill, elliptical or even a bike. If you are training for longer distance exercise, then the 1 mile test can be turned into a 2 mile test or a 3 mile test.

How much energy you have in the tank

When first starting an exercise program, most people lack the energy to cruise through an exercise session. Pay close attention to how you feel after various activities such as exercise and day to day stuff. As you move through an exercise program from week to week, progress will manifest it self in your energy levels. You will soon notice that walking up 3 flights of stairs with a book bag doesn’t get you out of breath as much as it used to or that running for 20 minutes no longer makes you feel sick afterwards. Increased energy levels both during exercise and during the day will show up sooner than some of the other indicators of progress.

How clothes fit

Even when scale numbers do not change, your body is changing. It may be building muscle at the same time as burning fat. Pants will start to feel loose if you are doing something right. This may take a while depending how quickly other things are progressing.

How much you like exercising

Most people that start exercising do so because they are trying to correct something with their physical status. Usually, when we have to work for something, the process is not as enjoyable as the outcome. Exercise is no exception. It is hard, time consuming and can take much discipline. However, if you stick with it long enough, it will become much more bearable. Pay attention to how you feel as you’re getting ready for each exercise session. Becoming more positive about physical activity is a huge indicator of progress.

How long your breaks are

How long of breaks do you take between sets of an exercise or between different exercises? Most general fitness exercisers wait until they catch their breath or until they feel physical ready. If you are exercising the right way, these breaks will get shorter as you get into better shape. What used to be a 1-2 minute break has now shortened itself to 30 seconds. If fatigue isn’t forcing you to take breaks anymore, then it is time to look at the first progress indicator I mentioned. In other words, increase your weights.

How sore you are the next day

Generally speaking, the start of an exercise program brings much muscular soreness the day after exercise. As we get into better shape this will taper off. Sure, even the most advanced exercisers get sore after workouts, but it is much more bearable than those first 2 weeks of exercise. Training for general fitness will see soreness taper off as individuals get into better shape. Compare how sore you are after the first day back from a break to how you feel 5 weeks into a program.

Incorporate all of these indicators of progress into how you assess your fitness levels from month to month. Just because a scale number isn’t constantly changing is not a reason to lose all hope. However, if progress isn’t indicated by any of the above, then it is time to reassess your fitness program.

Stop Looking at the Scale, Part 1: Why Weight Changes more than the Weather

August 3, 2011 By: afeldman 1 Comment

With an increased focus on weight management due to the rise of obesity, frequent exercisers have picked up the habit of constant weighing. While the measurement that comes from a scale can be one way to see if exercise is working, there are better things to do then checking weight every 5 minutes. When constantly stepping on the scale, frustration follows since the number does not keep up with expectations. Ideally, weight would only go down on a weight loss program but it is actually normal for weight to fluctuate in both directions on a consistent basis. In this two part article, I would like to go over the reasons for weight fluctuation and also, some alternative ways to measure your progress.

Time of day fluctuation = weight fluctuation

When taking weight, some people check their weight at various times of the day. Throughout the day, bodyweight will fluctuate based off of the reasons I have listed below. An individual could see a 3-7 pound difference from a morning weigh in to an evening weigh in, so keep that in mind next time you see a “night time weight” and start panicking.

Meal fluctuation = weight fluctuation

One of the reasons for the “time of day fluctuation” is a meal schedule. As you eat, obviously you will gain weight from the food immediately. It is digesting in your stomach and being processed, so until your body has gotten rid of waste and water contents of food, the scale will show a noticeably higher amount. Meal fluctuations also include differences in day to day food choices. If your meals are not the exact same thing every day, then your weight will be different from one day to the next. Foods like beans will take much longer to digest then something like a banana. This does not mean that you need to eat the same thing every day; it just means that you shouldn’t expect the scale to be a reliable measurement every single day.

Activity fluctuation = weight fluctuation

During the day, the human body is constantly sweating. Sometimes it is noticeable such as in exercise or hard labor and other times it evaporates so quickly we don’t even know. All sweat that leaves the body is water leaving our system. During a half hour of exercise in the summer sun, one could see an incredible loss of water weight from sweating. Weight losses from sweating do not relate to fat loss and they are also unhealthy if not corrected after working out. If you lose 3 pounds of water during an exercise session, this fluid needs to be replaced as soon as possible for your body to function at its normal levels.

Water fluctuation = weight fluctuation

If I weigh myself at this moment and somebody wants me to show them how quickly I can gain weight, I will start chugging down water. The same thing applies to a normal scale weigh in. If you weight yourself after drinking a large amount of water, that will obviously increase the number you see on the scale. Also, there are times when we drink water and our body will hold on to it much longer than normal; this is called water retention. Water retention is caused by things like extreme diet changes, alcohol, dehydration and stress.

Sodium fluctuation = weight fluctuation

Sodium fluctuation and water fluctuation counteract with each other. Extreme changes in the diet usually mean extreme changes in how much salt one is consuming. While sodium is vital to the body, an excess amount of it can cause water retention. When starting a diet or taking a day off from one, the bouncing from a low sodium level to a high one or vice versa may throw off your weight because of water retention.

Clothing fluctuation = weight fluctuation

This one is pretty simple but we sometimes forget this. Clothes can add on weight. If you weigh yourself fully clothed one day compared to just a t-shirt the next, there will be a difference in weight.

Location fluctuation = weight fluctuation

There are a couple of factors that go into this. One is the use of a different scale. Some scales are not calibrated leaving them to give you wrong measurements. The floor that a scale rests on may also be uneven. When I was doing weekly weigh ins last year for fitness competitions, I experimented around with the scale. I moved it around to different locations in the house to see if the numbers changed. I saw fluctuations of 5 pounds!

The bottom line is that there are many factors that go into how much you weigh besides how much fat you carry. These become especially apparent when weight is taken at a variety of times and situations. To use weight as a measurement, your body should be in a consistent state for each weighing.

How to properly weigh your self

1.Weigh yourself at the same time each weighing.

2. Weigh yourself right after waking up and using the restroom.

3. Weigh yourself no more often than once a week.

4.To make a weigh in reliable try to keep your eating the afternoon/evening before consistent from week to week.

5.Always rehydrate yourself right after a workout to avoid confusion that comes from lost water weight/water retention and more importantly, because your body needs water!

6. Clean up the diet of excess salt.

Let me run a scenario by everyone. On Monday, Cindy weighs herself at 170 pounds. During that day, she exercises for an hour without rehydrating and she sticks to easily digested foods. Tuesday morning, Cindy weighs herself at 165 pounds, 5 pounds in one day! After weighing herself, Cindy has a busy day at work in which she is seated all day, she eats high salt foods and decides to weigh herself again on Wednesday morning. Now Cindy’s weight is reading 172. This can’t be right; she has gained 7 pounds in one day. The truth is that Cindy’s weight difference has nothing to do with her body fat level changing. We now know the proper way for her to step on a scale but what else can she do to check her progress? The solution to this problem will be shown in part 2 of my series.

Weight Loss Drug Rejected

April 1, 2011 By: office 2 Comments

Not that we’re really shocked, but yet another diet drug has been rejected by the Food and Drug Administration.  This time, the drug was Contrave and U.S. health officials have requested a clinical trial to resolve heart safety concerns, according to a recent article from Reuters. This pill looked like it was going to be the first new diet pill in a decade.

Weight Loss Pill

Another weight loss pill has been rejected by the Food and Drug Administration.

Orexigen’s Contrave was one of three obesity drugs under review after an FDA advisory panel had voted to recommend Contrave’s approval back in December.  However, there is a potential heart risk when used long-term by overweight and obese subjects, which concerned the FDA.

The drug manufacturer, Orexigen, has been told that they must conduct a study “of sufficient size and duration” to address the cardiovascular risks.

In company studies, at least 35 percent of patients lost 5 percent or more of their body weight.  The research also showed a slight rise in blood pressure and pulse rates with Contrave versus a placebo.  This is what led to the FDA’s decision to reject the pill for the time being and require a more long-term study of the weight loss drug’s side effects.

This is the third weight loss drug to be rejected by the FDA over the past six months, which should be a strong indication of their risky side effects.  There are obviously safer ways to lose weight.  The best and most simple way to lose weight remains consistent: healthy diet in combination with regular exercise.  It doesn’t need to be complicated!  Pills for weight loss are a very drastic way to combat obesity and side effects are always a possibility, when compared with making simple changes to your lifestyle.

Camp Shane weight loss camp for children and teens and Shane Diet Resorts weight loss program for adults follows the simple formula of healthy diet and exercise for the best weight loss results.  By losing weight gradually, good habits are formed that will continue for life.

What are your thoughts on this newest diet pill rejection?  Do you feel that a weight loss drug is a healthy option to lose weight?

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